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Looking for good conferences / workshops on applications of renormalization group methods

+ 4 like - 0 dislike
869 views

I am looking for conferences and/or workshops, where people working on different problems using renormalization group methods come together to share their results and experience.

As I have noted, there exist (at least) two largely different approaches to do renormalization calculations, dependent on the field of application:

In fluid dynamics context, the renormalization methods used to calculate effective viscosities for example, are only valid if a single scale invariant subrange (or fixed point) can be assumed are mostly inspired by the work of Yakhot & Orszag.

Conversely, by applying the more general functional or exact renormalization group (ERG) methods, widely used in quantum field theory for example, it is possible to investigate the whole renormalization group flow which may contain several different fixed points.

I am currently interested in both approaches (and in comparing them), so I'd appreciate any pointers to (upcoming) events where people discuss the application of one or the other (or even better both!) of these renormalization approaches to different problems.

This post imported from StackExchange MathOverflow at 2014-06-17 09:27 (UCT), posted by SE-user Dilaton
asked Nov 11, 2013 in Resources and References by Dilaton (4,295 points) [ no revision ]
retagged Jun 17, 2014
I don't think this question is appropriate for MO. While I don't think that one like it has appeared before, it is definitely established that it is not appropriate to use MO to advertise conferences, and this seems close enough to that.

This post imported from StackExchange MathOverflow at 2014-06-17 09:27 (UCT), posted by SE-user Andy Putman
@AndyPutman hm I saw that a few questions about conferences were received positively and got even nice answers, so I hoped it would work for me too. I investigated many aspects of these topics on my own, but at our institute such research directions are (not yet) represented, so I really need to go to conferences/workshops to discuss my work and ideas with other people to seriously enter the field. Therefore I hoped that some people who are already working on such things could give me some expert advice about where I could go ... :-/

This post imported from StackExchange MathOverflow at 2014-06-17 09:27 (UCT), posted by SE-user Dilaton
Dear Dilation, I agree with Andy. I suppose there are other possible avenues to find such information.

This post imported from StackExchange MathOverflow at 2014-06-17 09:27 (UCT), posted by SE-user Gil Kalai
@GilKalai exactly this is my problem: I have no other possible avenues to find such information, as for example asking a colleague next door or anybody else face to face who could help me with an good insider expert advice. At my institute, working with renormalization methods is not yet established (this is what I will be trying to do in the course of time) so finding people and if possible coworkers is what I wanted to achieve among other things by visiting an appropriate event say next year ...

This post imported from StackExchange MathOverflow at 2014-06-17 09:27 (UCT), posted by SE-user Dilaton
Dilation, still MO is not the right avenue for that. (You may try to look around over the internet and you can also try to email researchers in the field and ask them.)

This post imported from StackExchange MathOverflow at 2014-06-17 09:27 (UCT), posted by SE-user Gil Kalai

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