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Are there books on Regularization and Renormalization in QFT at an Introductory level?

+ 7 like - 0 dislike
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Are there books on Regularization and Renormalization, in the context of quantum field theory at an Introductory level? Could you suggest one?

Added: I posted at math.SE the question Reference request: Introduction to mathematical theory of Regularization and accepted this answer by Willie Wong.


This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user Américo Tavares

asked Jul 18, 2011 in Theoretical Physics by Américo Tavares (35 points) [ revision history ]
retagged Mar 25, 2014 by dimension10
Most voted comments show all comments
What does introductory mean? Regularization (as a physical procedure) is quite useless without context. The context being quantum field theory, scattering processes and some familiarity with particle physics (certainly at least QED). Also, what about the wikipedia article? It mentions all the standard regularizations (dimensional and zeta, Pauli-Villars, lattice, momentum cutoff) and even some less standard ones. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regularization_%28physics%29

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user Marek
I've made this community wiki in keeping with out practice for requests for list of books and papers. That said, I can't find a meta question in which we settled that: it seems to be something that David, mbq, and I have just been doing. Maybe we discussed in on the moderator chat?

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user dmckee
I don't remember us discussing it specifically, but it's just general Stack Exchange practice to wikify questions which don't have a single correct answer. Most questions about books and papers are of this sort ("What is a good book/paper about X"), but I think I've seen a couple questions here that ask about a very specific paper, and those would not be CW material.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user David Z
@Marek: I know nothing about this technique and thought that it could be learnt without context. So, I will restrict the scope of my question to quantum field theory. @ dmckee: CW is fine.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user Américo Tavares
@Américo: well, there of course is a mathematical theory of regularization (Cesaro, Borel, Ramanujan summations and many others) that is interesting per se but I suppose you'd be better off asking about those things at math.SE. When it comes to physics, the regularization isn't very useful by itself when not accompanied by renormalization. Regularization just tells you how to control singularities by introducing some additional parameter but it doesn't tell you what to do with them (indeed, there is often nothing one can do rigorously, so one proceeds in an intuitive physical fashion).

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user Marek
Most recent comments show all comments
you can try Elizalde's book on ZETA REGULARIZATION but the best of the best is Hardy's book 'divergent series' and is freely avaliable online to download it , i strongly recommend this one :)

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user Jose Javier Garcia
@Jose Javier Garcia: Thank you!

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user Américo Tavares

2 Answers

+ 7 like - 0 dislike

Check out the following 3 articles and 2 books:

  1. Regularization Renormalization and Dimensional Analysis: Dimensional Regularization meets Freshman E&M Published in the american journal of physics (can be found also on hep-ph, but slightly different with less references)
  2. Regularization, from Murayama's course of QFT at Berkeley
  3. A Hint of Renormalization
  4. A more general detailed, still introductory, treatment including renormalization would be the book Renormalization Methods: A Guide For Beginners
  5. A. Zee's book QFT in a Nutshell

Anyway, I hope that was useful

Revo

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user Revo
answered Aug 7, 2011 by Revo (260 points) [ no revision ]
Thanks! It is useful indeed. I think the example of the infinite line of charge in the 1st article is a good starting point for me (as a retired electrical engineer) to learn with time this subject.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user Américo Tavares
I have updated the 1st link, please recheck it, also here is another link for the same article which looks like slides for a talk hep.wisc.edu/cteq11/lectures/Olness_DimReg.pdf

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user Revo
Hadn't seen it before, but that note from the Berkeley QFT class is outstanding!

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user Gerben
+ 1 like - 0 dislike

See also my tutorial paper Renormalization without infinities - a tutorial, which discusses renormalization on a much simpler level than quantum field theory.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user Arnold Neumaier
answered Mar 15, 2012 by Arnold Neumaier (11,395 points) [ no revision ]
Thanks! I will see it.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user Américo Tavares
vixra.org/abs/1003.0235 my paper on zeta regularization and resummation to obtain finite results for integrals.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-03-24 04:52 (UCT), posted by SE-user Jose Javier Garcia

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