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References for ADM formalism and cosmological perturbation theory

+ 4 like - 0 dislike
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What would you consider the best online resources for learning the 3+1 ADM formalism and gauge invariant perturbation theory in cosmology? (Assuming intermediate level GR and QFT familiarity)


This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-04-01 16:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user dbrane

asked Jan 20, 2011 in Resources and References by dbrane (375 points) [ revision history ]
recategorized Apr 24, 2014 by dimension10

3 Answers

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Hah, I just studied this a while ago with James Bardeen, so I would say he is the best resource for learning this! Since you probably don't have access to the physical Bardeen, you can check out:

Physical Review D, Vol 22 no 8 (1980) "Gauge-invariant cosmological perturbations"

and

Physical Review D, Vol 40 no 6 (1989) "Designing density fluctuation spectra in inflation"

There is also a set of lecture notes I have sitting on my desk by him that claim they are "to be published in Particle Physics and Cosmology" which are dated 1988, so presumably they were published within the next year or so.

If you can find them, the talks are probably the easier of the three, and the first PrD article is the second easiest. The third paper is very nice, but more technically difficult.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-04-01 16:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user Mr X
answered Jan 21, 2011 by Mr X (200 points) [ no revision ]
Is the third one "Cosmological Perturbations from Quantum Fluctuations to Large Scale structure"? Because that's the "starred" reference in a Part III DAMTP lecture I'm attending, but the article simply doesn't seem to be online anywhere.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-04-01 16:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user dbrane
Yes, it is. It seems to be published in a book, maybe you can get it through your library or interlibrary loan? slac.stanford.edu/spires/find/books?cl=QB981:C2:1988

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-04-01 16:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user Mr X
+ 3 like - 0 dislike

The single best reference for learning about gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory is ch. 7 of Mukhanov's book Physical foundations of Cosmology. Ok, not an online resource, but still the very best if that's what you're looking for.

On doing a search for one of York's original papers I ran into this wonderful site by Luca Bombelli at Ole' Miss (University of Mississippi). This contains a very comprehensive bibliography on the initial-value problem. I would also recommend Robert Wald's GR book. It has very nice coverage of the IVP in chapters and in an appendix.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-04-01 16:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user user346
answered Jan 21, 2011 by Deepak Vaid (1,975 points) [ no revision ]
+1 for referencing Mukhanov's book, which I've consistently to found to be useful and clear.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-04-01 16:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user Matt Reece

the book is online ; easy to find ...

+ 2 like - 0 dislike

Ma & Bertschinger (1995): http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995ApJ...455....7M

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-04-01 16:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user Jeremy
answered Jan 21, 2011 by UnknownToSE (500 points) [ no revision ]

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